Flowers

Lisianthus meaning

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Lisianthus: origin of meaning

The lisianthus or eustoma, as you want to call it, is a relatively young plant. This wild plant was discovered in the near 19th century in the United States of America and especially in Nebraska and Louisiana. Then transported in 1805 to the Garden of Glasgow, Scotland, it also arrived in Europe but remained almost unknown until 1902, the year in which they first appeared in a German catalog. Although it was necessary to wait until the early 1990s to be able to see eustoma flowers on the shelves of French florists, it is in France that they will become depopulated in the following years becoming one of the most popular flowers. Etymologically, the meaning of the name eustoma derives from the Greek and consists of two parts: eu which can mean both beautiful and good, and stoma which means mouth, opening. Here, therefore, by combining the two terms we arrive at a meaning that could suggest a possible sentimental opening towards the recipient of the flowers. At a level linked more to the appearance of the flowers, however, those who give one or more specimens of lisianthus they should know that they symbolize grace and elegance.


Botany of lisianthus

Botanically, lisianthus belongs to the Gentianaceae family and can have an annual cultivation period if it is intended to be grown outside or perennial if kept inside a house because it is a type of flower that needs humidity and warmth. If you intend to grow it in your garden, we recommend planting the seeds in the period from November to February and make sure you have an average temperature of 15 degrees, bearing in mind that it does not survive below 5 degrees. Therefore, preference should be given to cool and ventilated places that are not exposed to bad weather. The enemies of eustoma are ladybugs and mites: so be careful to keep them away. The growth rate of this type of flowers is quite slow. It is made up of thin stems about 45 centimeters long and large green leaves (tending towards blue). At the end of the stem we find the ringlets which when they bloom will become flowers with a bell-shaped shape.

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